Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Pepe Julian Onziema Interview Pt. II (Web Exclusive)

The idea that African homosexuality was a colonial import is a myth

Africa has 54 countries and more than a billion people. One of the most ridiculous myths about it is that homosexuality did not exist in the continent until white men imported it. Robert Mugabe is one such propagator, calling homosexuality “un-African” and a “white disease”.

http://76crimes.com/2014/01/30/21-varieties-of-traditional-african-homosexuality/

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/monkey-cage/wp/2014/10/30/the-british-colonial-origins-of-anti-gay-laws/

As for what Pepe stated, she is right; you can blame others as much as you want, but it solves nothing. The past ignorance from the Brits that lead to anti-gay legislation in Africa and  some Christian missionaries advocating for persecution of homosexuals does not excuse other for part-taking in the same behavior. There has been a lot of distortion in the continent of Africa and in the Eastern world, and they have to break the mental chains from the past. Finding their roots, their history absent from the manipulation of others.   

Little Richard: Flamboyant Provocateur

Synopsis

Born Richard Wayne Penniman on December 5, 1932, in Macon, Georgia, Little Richard helped define the early rock ‘n’ roll era of the 1950s with his driving, flamboyant sound. With his croons, wails and screams, he turned songs like “Tutti-Frutti” and “Long Tall Sally” into huge hits and influenced such bands as the Beatles.

http://www.biography.com/people/little-richard-9383571

http://www.allmusic.com/artist/little-richard-mn0000824022

Little Richard (born Richard Wayne Penniman, December 5, 1932 in Macon, Georgia, United States) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist, and an early pioneer of rock ‘n’ roll, influencing generations of R&B and rock artists. Many of his fans have proclaimed Richard as The Real King of Rock ‘n’ Roll (in reference to the deceased Elvis Presley, who’s known by the moniker “The King of Rock ‘n’ Roll”). He has also been called the King of Rockin ‘n’ Rollin, Rhythm & Blues Soulin’. His original injection of funk into the rock and roll beat in the mid-1950’s also had a profound influence on the development of that genre of music.

http://www.last.fm/music/Little+Richard

https://rockhall.com/inductees/little-richard/bio/

https://rockhall.com/inductees/little-richard/

Bo-Diddley: The Originator

He only had a few hits in the 1950s and early ’60s, but as Bo Diddley sang, “You Can’t Judge a Book by Its Cover.” You can’t judge an artist by his chart success, either, and Diddley produced greater and more influential music than all but a handful of the best early rockers. The Bo Diddley beat — bomp, ba-bomp-bomp, bomp-bomp — is one of rock & roll’s bedrock rhythms, showing up in the work of Buddy Holly, the Rolling Stones, and even pop-garage knock-offs like the Strangeloves‘ 1965 hit “I Want Candy.” Diddley‘s hypnotic rhythmic attack and declamatory, boasting vocals stretched back as far as Africa for their roots, and looked as far into the future as rap. His trademark otherworldly vibrating, fuzzy guitar style did much to expand the instrument’s power and range. But even more important, Bo‘s bounce was fun and irresistibly rocking, with a wisecracking, jiving tone that epitomized rock & roll at its most humorously outlandish and freewheeling.

In the 1950s, as a founder of rock ’n’ roll, Mr. Diddley — along with Chuck Berry, Little Richard,Jerry Lee Lewis and a few others — helped to reshape the sound of popular music worldwide, building on the templates of blues, Southern gospel, R&B and postwar black American vernacular culture.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/03/arts/music/03diddley.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

http://www.allmusic.com/artist/bo-diddley-mn0000055128/biography

“I opened the door for a lot of people, and they just ran through and left me holding the knob,” he told The New York Times in 2003.

He was a hero to those who had learned from him, including the Rolling Stones and the Beatles. A generation later, he became a model of originality to punk or post-punk bands like the Clash and the Fall.

http://www.last.fm/music/Bo+Diddley

http://www.biography.com/people/bo-diddley-9274270

Abbas Ibn Firnas: First Aviator

Abbas Ibn Firnas, also known as Abbas Abu Al-Qasim Ibn Firnas Ibn Wirdas al-Takurini, was a Muslim Berber-Andalusian polymath: an inventor, physician, engineer, Andalusian musician, and Arabic-language poet. 

Human Flight

The Moors’ scientific curiosity extended to flight when polymath Ibn Firnas made the first scientific attempt to fly in a controlled manner, in 875 A.D.  His attempt evidently worked, although the landing was less successful.

Abbas Bin Firnas (810–887 AD): the Berber, Andalusian inventor-engineer Abbas Bin Firnas was born in Izn-Rand Onda (Ronda, Spain) in 810 AD. At the age 70 he has entered the pages of history as the first man to fly. Inspired by birds, he invented artificial wings, covered them and himself with feathers, took to a hill in Cordoba, and launched himself into the air. He was said to have flown for a considerable time before he crash-landed, badly hurting his back, apparently because he failed to include a ‘tail’ in his prototype. His story was told by the Moroccan historian Ahmed Mohammed Maqqari (d.1632), based on a 9th century account of the poet Mu’min Ibn Said, who said that Ibn Firnas flew faster than the phoenix and that he dressed his body in the feathers of a vulture [Lynn Townsend White, Jr., Eilmer of Malmesbury, an Eleventh Century Aviator: A Case Study of Technological Innovation, Its Context and Tradition, Technology and Culture 2 (2), 1961, p. 97–111]. 

http://www.grouporigin.com/clients/qatarfoundation/chapter2_7.htm

https://www.temehu.com/imazighen/berbers.htm

Abu al-Qasim Khalaf ibn al-Abbas Al-Zahrawi, known as Albucasis (936-1013)

Abu al-Qasim Khalaf ibn al-Abbas Al-Zahrawi was born near Cordoba, Spain, when it was part of the Islamic Empire. He was a physician, surgeon and chemist. He is best remembered for his encyclopedia of medicine, the Al-Tasrif li man ajaz an-il-talif (An Aid for Those Who Lack the Capacity to Read Big Books), known as the al-Tasrif. This became a standard reference in Islamic and European medicine for over 500 years. In Europe, Al-Zahrawi was known as Albucasis, and was particularly famous for his surgical knowledge.

http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/broughttolife/people/albucasis.aspx

http://www.muslimheritage.com/article/abu-al-qasim-al-zahrawi-great-surgeon

http://lostislamichistory.com/al-zahrawi/

http://www.fstc.org.uk/al-zahrawi

http://www.islamicspain.tv/Arts-and-Science/The-Culture-of-Al-Andalus/Medicine.htm

Ziryab: Abu l-Hasan Ali Ibn Nafi

Fashion and Hygiene

Abu l-Hasan Ali Ibn Nafi – who was also known as Ziryab (black singing bird in Arabic) and Pájaro Negro (blackbird) in Spanish- was a polymath, with knowledge in astronomy, geography, meteorology, botanics, cosmetics, culinary art and fashion. He is known for starting a vogue by changing clothes according to the weather and season. He also suggested different clothing for mornings, afternoons and evenings.

He created a deodorant to eliminate bad odors, promoted morning and evening baths, and emphasized  maintaining personal hygiene. Ziryab is believed to have invented an early toothpaste, which he popularized throughout Islamic Iberia – primarily in Spain.

He made fashionable shaving among men and set new haircut trends. Royalty used to wash their hair with rosewater, but Ziryab introduced salt and fragrant oils to improve the hair’s condition.

Cuisine

Ziryab was also an arbiter of culinary fashion and taste, and revolutionized the local cuisine by introducing new fruit and vegetables such as asparagus, and by initiating the three-course meal served on leathern tablecloths. He insisted that meals should be served in three separate courses consisting of soup, the main course, and dessert.

He also introduced the use of crystal as a container for drinks, which was more effective than metal. Prior to his time, food was served plainly on platters on bare tables, as was the case with the Romans.

In general, the Moors introduced many new crops including the orange, lemon, peach, apricot, fig, sugar cane, dates, ginger and pomegranate as well as saffron, cotton, silk and rice,  all of which remain prominent in Spain today.

From the information, I believe Ziryab was apart of the Afro-Asiatic group; meaning he is connected to Middle Eastern culture as well.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/afroasiatic

A little off subject, but this drink looks good lol. 

Pajaro Negro

The namesake gentleman who the restaurant & bar is named after was a North African renaissance guy in the 8th Century who had his hands in everything from music to math and astronomy. The Spanish nicked named him Blackbird or Pajaro Negro ($10, mezcal, Cynar, Galliano Ristretto, orange peel).

The drink has an iced coffee like feel, a little smoky, a little bitter, brightened up nicely with the orange twist. More of a after dinner drink than a starter.

http://www.alcademics.com/2013/09/a-look-at-ziryab-in-san-francisco.html

http://www.islamicspain.tv/Arts-and-Science/flight_of_the_blackbird.htm

http://www.mandatory.com/2012/12/28/10-people-youve-never-heard-of-who-changed-history/8

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Abul-Hasan+Ali+Ibn+Nafi

Moorish Spain

When the topic of the Moorish influence in Europe is being discussed, one of the first questions that arises is, what race were they?

As early as the Middle Ages, “Moors were commonly viewed as being mostly black or very swarthy, and hence the word is often used for negro,” according to the Oxford English Dictionary.

Author and historian Chancellor Williams said “the original Moors, like the original Egyptians, were black Africans.”

The 16th century English playwright William Shakespeare used the word Moor as a synonym for African. His contemporary Christopher Marlowe also used African and Moor interchangeably.

Arab writers further buttress the black identity of the Moors.  The powerful Moorish Emperor Yusuf ben-Tachfin is described by an Arab chronicler as “a brown man with wooly hair.”

Black soldiers, specifically identified as Moors, were actively recruited by Rome, and served in Britain, France, Switzerland, Austria, Hungary, Poland, and Romania.  St. Maurice, patron saint of medieval Europe, was only one of many black soldiers and officers under the employ of the Roman Empire.

Although generations of Spanish rulers have tried to expunge this era from the historical record, recent archeology and scholarship now shed fresh light on the Moors who flourished in Al-Andalus for more than 700 years – from 711 AD until 1492.  The Moorish advances in mathematics, astronomy, art, and agriculture helped propel Europe out of the Dark Ages and into the Renaissance.

Source:  Stewartsynopsis.com/moors_in_europe.htm

Universal Education

The Moors brought enormous learning to Spain that over centuries would percolate through the rest of Europe.

The intellectual achievements of the Moors in Spain had a lasting effect; education was universal in Moorish Spain, while in Christian Europe, 99 percent of the population was illiterate, and even kings could neither read nor write. At a time when Europe had only two universities, the Moors had seventeen, located in Almeria, Cordova, Granada, Juen, Malaga, Seville, and Toledo.

In the 10th and 11th centuries, public libraries in Europe were non-existent, while Moorish Spain could boast of more than 70, including one in Cordova that housed hundreds of thousands of manuscripts. Universities in Paris and Oxford were established after visits by scholars to Moorish Spain.

It was this system of education, taken to Europe by the Moors, that seeded the European Renaissance and brought the continent out of the 1,000 years of intellectual and physical gloom of the Middle Ages.

By Abs Staff

Source: Blackhistorystudies.com/resources/resources/15-facts-on-the-moors-in-spain/

Culturespain.com/2012/03/02/what-did-the-moors-do-for-us/

Nevertheless, Europeans had held Africans in high regard for centuries prior, (from the Catholic patron saint, Maurice, to the legendary black knights). Therefore it was possible for many Africans to move to the highest eschelons of society, particularly in England, the Netherlands, Austria, Sweden, Russia and Germany. Some became nobles, military leaders, and other respectable professionals in royal courts throughout Europe (excluding the Iberian peninsula). They became so numerous in England that Queen Elizabeth I issued a warrant (July 1596) and a proclamation (January 1601) by which she expelled all “Blackmoores” from England:

The Queen is highly discontented to understand the great number of Negroes and black a moors which are [in England]; who are fostered here, to the great annoyance of her own people who are unhappy at the help these people receive, as also most of them are infidels having no understanding of Christ…

http://www.taneter.org/moors2.html

Now seeded the Renaissance doesn’t mean the sole creator, just one of the seeds that created inspiration to create and a thirst for knowledge. 

Afro-Asiatic languages

Afroasiatic languages (ăf´rōā´zhēăt´Ĭk), formerly Hamito-Semitic languages(hăm´Ĭtō-səmĬt´Ĭk), family of languages spoken by more than 250 million people in N Africa; much of the Sahara; parts of E, central, and W Africa; and W Asia (especially the Arabian peninsula, Iraq, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, and Israel). Since four of the Afroasiatic tongues, Arabic, Hebrew, Coptic, and Syriac, are also respectively the languages of Islam, Judaism, and two sects of the Christian faith, the language family reaches many millions in addition to its native speakers.

The Afroasiatic family is divided into six branches: Egyptian, Semtic, Berber, Cushitic, Omotic, and Chadic. According to one theory, the languages of the Afroasiatic family are thought to have first been spoken along the shores of the Red Sea. Another theory holds that the language family came into being in Africa, for only in Africa are all its members found, aside from some Semitic languages encountered in SW Asia. The existence of the Semitic languages in W Asia is explained by assuming that African Semitic speakers migrated from E Africa to W Asia in very ancient times. At a later date, some Semitic speakers returned from Arabia to Africa.

http://www.encyclopedia.com/topic/Afroasiatic_languages.aspx

Indian Sculpture Debunks False Historical Notions

This is the Konark Sun Temple in India, and I am going to show you a sculpture that flies in the face of mainstream history. Historians claim that Africa had no connection with India until Vasco Da Gama reached India in 1498.

But look at this carving, it clearly shows a Giraffe on the left side and all its legs, body and long neck are shown with remarkable accuracy. Notice how even its face, the ears and even its long tail are carved perfectly depicting a real giraffe. This is incredible, because Giraffes are found only in Africa, and this temple was built no later than 1250 A.D. And Giraffes are not found in Egypt, where we know advanced civilization existed, but are found far down south in the African continent. According to historians Vasco Da Gama was the first person to ever visit India from Africa. They claim that he had briefly explored Africa, before reaching India in 1498. How is an African Giraffe accurately carved at least two hundred and fifty years before Vasco Da Gama’s arrival to India?

Let us to take a good look at the entire carving. It clearly shows an Indian King sitting on an Elephant on the left side. You can even see another person sitting in front of him who controls the elephant. On the right side, you can side several people wearing long skirts standing on the ground. The clothing and the faces are carved distinctly different from other Indian sculptures, to show that they are African people. It also looks like they are lifting a few other people who are giving something to the Indian King. On the far right you can see the Giraffe, and a young boy sitting on it, while there is bystander watching this entire scene. All this happens under a tree that has very large flowers, almost the size of an elephant’s head.

Did this meeting happen while an Indian King was traveling to Africa? It’s less likely because the sculptor who carved this, would have not have seen it. It’s much more likely that African travelers visited India way before Vasco Da Gama, which is not mentioned in anywhere in History. And whether this journey took place through land or water, it is truly a remarkable feat to bring a Giraffe alive through such a long trip.
So, now we know that India was connected to Africa, centuries before what the history claims. It also proves that ancient Africans had a very advanced civilization that was capable of making journeys to other continents. Is it possible that ancient Africans and Indians had established trade routes between continents? Thanks to the Indian sculptor for carving such an accurate scene, because without this we would just be depending on mainstream historians.

http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/africa/economy/

For anyone who has been paying attention to Sincere Ignorance posts within the Art/Culture, Ancient /Modern History (Categories) and Museum Directory page; it doesn’t come as a surprise to me. The different cultures within Africa were trading with India, China and other Asian countries. In fact the different kingdoms/tribes within the African continent was trading with virtually everyone. It was never this dark continent, but was very much apart of the world and its activities.

 

Trade between India and Africa has a long and distinguished history. It goes back thousands of years to the days when Indian traders, using the seasonal monsoon winds, sailed to the East coast of Africa in search of mangrove poles, elephant tusks, and gold and gemstones that made their way up from what is now Zimbabwe.

This intensified with the establishment of Omani suzerainty in the 17th century over Zanzibar and its hinterland. The island of Pemba produced a copious variety of sought-after spices such as cardamom, cloves, cinnamon and black pepper. A number of Indian merchants, some of whose descendants live in East Africa to this day, trace their presence in East Africa to this period.

http://www.global-briefing.org/2012/10/india-africa-trade-a-unique-relationship/

http://vedicempire.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=66&Itemid=27

The Indian sub-continent already has a population bigger than China’s, and by 2030 India alone will have the largest population in the world. Indian civilisation is over 5000 years old, one in which 325 languages are spoken in 1652 dialects. It is the world’s largest democracy and the fourth largest economy. It is the largest English-speaking nation and has the second largest pool of engineers and scientists.

It is the only society that has never known slavery, and has never invaded another nation. It was also the richest country on Earth, until Britain rose up in the 17th century and plundered, among others, India’s wealth.

As trade intensified between Africa and Asia, prosperous city-states flourished along the eastern coast of Africa.  These included Kilwa, Sofala, Mombasa, Malindi, and others.  The city-states traded with inland kingdoms like Great Zimbabwe to obtain gold, ivory, and iron.  These materials were then sold to places like India, Southeast Asia, and China.  These were Africa’s exports in the Indian Ocean Trade.  These items could be sold at a profit because they were scarce in Asian countries.

http://www.bu.edu/africa/outreach/resources/indian/

Africans living among communities on the west coast of India were called Sidis, and those living in the interior were referred to as Habshi. Today, the terms refer generally to Indians of African descent and are used interchangeably.

Africans in India worked as soldiers, sailors, traders, bureaucrats, clerics, bodyguards and concubines. Almost all of these Africans were Muslims, and many were slaves conscripted into the slave armies of Indian Muslim rulers

http://exploringafrica.matrix.msu.edu/students/curriculum/m15/activity2.php

Can We Auto-Correct Humanity? Prince Ea

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