Henry P. Cheatham: American History

Born into slavery in Henderson, North Carolina, Henry Cheatham was the child of an enslaved domestic worker about who little is known.  An adolescent after the American Civil War, Cheatham benefited from country’s short lived commitment to provide educational opportunities to all children.  He attended public school where he excelled in his studies.  After high school Cheatham was admitted to Shaw University, founded for the children of freedmen, graduating with honors in 1882.  He earned a masters degree from the same institution in 1887.

During his senior year of college, Cheatham helped to found a home for African American orphans.  In 1883, Cheatham was hired as the Principal of the State Normal School for African Americans, at Plymouth, North Carolina.  He held the position for a year when his career as an educator gave way to his desire to enter state politics.
Cheatham ran a successful campaign for the office of Registrar of Deeds at Vance County, North Carolina in 1884, and he served the county for four years.   He also studied law during his first term in office, with an eye toward national politics.  In 1888 Henry Cheatham ran for Congress as a Republican in North Carolina’s Second Congressional District.  He defeated his white Democratic opponent, Furnifold M. Simmons.

Cheatham entered the Fifty-first U.S. Congress and would be returned to office again in 1890.  As a United States Congressman, Cheatham supported Henry Cabot Lodge’s Federal Elections Bill sponsored by representatives who wished to end election violence against African American voters.  Although Cheatham’s efforts helped the measure pass in the House of Representatives, the Lodge bill was killed in the U.S. Senate.  Later, Cheatham sponsored an unsuccessful bill requiring Congress to appropriate funds for African American participation at the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893.  Cheatham wanted the fair’s visitors to see the demonstrable progress African Americans had made since the end of slavery.

– See more at: http://www.blackpast.org/aah/cheatham-henry-plummer-1857-1935#sthash.DoLj0L5f.dpuf

http://www.northcarolinahistory.org/encyclopedia/529/entry

Other noteworthy people to look into:

James E. O’hara

John Adams Hyman

Search Engine: 

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Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones: American History

Sissieretta Jones was a world-famous soprano who in June 1892, became the first African American to perform at Carnegie Hall in New York City, New York. Touring internationally in the late 1800s and early 1900s, she sang both classicalopera and performed in musical comedies with her own troupe.

Born Matilda Sissieretta Joyner on January 5, 1869, in Portsmouth, Virginia, she was the child of Jeremiah Joyner, a pastor, and Henrietta Joyner, a singer in the church choir. After moving with her family to Rhode Island when she was six, Sissieretta began singing in the church choir, which was directed by her father. When only fourteen, she married David Richard Jones, who became her first manager. Later, she formally studied voice at the Providence Academy of Music, the New England Conservatory, and the Boston (Massachusetts) Conservatory.

Following her New York City debut on April 5, 1888 in Steinway Hall, she was nicknamed “the Black Patti” after being compared to the Italian prima donna Adelina Patti, well-known at the time. The nickname stayed with her throughout her 30-plus year career, although she preferred to be called Madame Jones. During the 1880s and 1890s, Jones performed at Madison Square Garden, Boston’s Music Hall and the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Illinois. She first performed at the White House in February 1892 for President Benjamin Harrison and returned to appear before Presidents Grover Cleveland, William McKinley, and Theodore Roosevelt. She also appeared before the British Royal Family. Jones’s international tours took her to the Caribbean, South America, Australia, India and Southern Africa as well as London, Paris (France), Berlin (Germany), Milan, Munich, and St. Petersburg (Russia). By 1895 Jones had become the most well known and highly paid African American performer of her day. – See more at: http://www.blackpast.org/aah/jones-sissieretta-1869-1933#sthash.nUhTYtWf.dpuf

http://www.operanews.com/Opera_News_Magazine/2012/11/Departments/Sissieretta_Jones.html

J. Rosamond Johnson: American History

J. Rosamond Johnson was one of many black American composers who were inspired by the music of Afro-English composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor. “Nobody Knows” appeared as part of “The Books of American Negro Spirituals,” by Johnson and his brother, James Weldon Johnson. J. Rosamond Johnson writes in the score of Nobody Knows, “This is a rare version,” and dedicates his arrangement to Henry Krehbiel. It is the alternate tune to the familiar, standard version of this spiritual.

Rodrick Dixon’s moving performance of “Nobody Knows De Trouble I See” was filmed in Portland, Maine, in October 2012 as part of production for the documentary film “Samuel Coleridge-Taylor and His Music in America, 1900-1912.” Photo of J. Rosamond Johnson used with permission of Melanie Edwards, JRJ’s granddaughter. For more information visit:
http://www.longfellowchorus.com/samue…

Composer, actor, and pioneer in his field, John Rosamond Johnson was one of the most successful of the early African American composers. Born on August 11, 1873 in Jacksonville, Florida, Johnson was the younger brother of prominent composer and civil rights leader James Weldon Johnson. Starting in 1890, John Johnson attended Boston’s New England Conservatory, and for a brief time studied in Europe as well. He began his career as a music teacher in Jacksonville public schools but in 1899 moved to New York with his brother, James Weldon, to pursue a career in show business. One year later the Johnson brothers established a song writing partnership with Robert “Bob” Cole, a lyricist and vaudeville entertainer. Their working relationship lasted until Cole’s death in 1911 and would prove to be quite profitable, producing two popular all-black operettas on Broadway, The Shoo-Fly Regiment (1906) and The Red Moon (1908). With Cole, Johnson also wrote Congo Love Songs, My Castle on the Nile, and the enormously successful Under the Bamboo Tree in 1902. – See more at: http://www.blackpast.org/aah/johnson-j-rosamond-1873-1954#sthash.6teF1m7S.dpuf

http://jass.com/c&j.html

http://www.allmusic.com/artist/j-rosamond-johnson-mn0001396567/biography

George Henry White: American History

George H. White’s bold legislative proposals combating disfranchisement and mob violence in the South distinguished him from his more reserved contemporaries. The lone African–American Representative at the dawn of the 20th century, White spoke candidly on the House Floor, confronting Booker T. Washington’s call to work within the segregated system. The onslaught of white supremacy in his home state assured White that to campaign for a third term would be fruitless, and he departed the chamber on March 3, 1901. It would be 28 years before another black Representative set foot in the Capitol. “This, Mr. Chairman, is perhaps the negroes’ temporary farewell to the American Congress,” White declared in his final months as a Representative, “but let me say, Phoenix–like he will rise up someday and come again.”1

http://history.house.gov/People/Detail?id=23657

http://www.blackpast.org/1901-george-h-whites-farewell-address-congress

Alexander Manly

Alex Manly was editor of the Daily Record, a black newspaper from Wilmington, North Carolina at the time of the Wilmington Riot in 1898.  Manly was born near Raleigh, North Carolina in 1866.  He was reportedly a descendent of Governor Charles Manly and Corrine Manly, a former slave in the governor’s household.  Alex Manly and his brothers were educated at Hampton Institute, and in 1895 he took over Wilmington’s leading black newspaper, the Daily Record with the help of his brother, Frank.

The Wilmington Race Riot

In 1898, Wilmington was a thriving port city on the coast of North Carolina. About two-thirds of Wilmington’s population was African American. African Americans were business people who owned barbershops, restaurants, tailor shops, and drug stores. African Americans also held positions as firemen and policemen. Overall, the African American and white races existed peacefully but separately.

Good relations continued until the election of 1896, when the white Democrats lost control of state politics. A group of predominately white Populists and African American Republicans won political control of the state. The white Democrats promised to avenge their defeat at the hands of white Populists and African American Republicans in the election of 1898. Daniel Schenck, a Democratic party leader, warned, “It will be the meanest, vilest, dirtiest campaign since 1876” (the election that ended reconstruction in the South).

http://www.learnnc.org/lp/editions/nchist-newsouth/4360

Black Cowboys Missing From The History Pages

Fast forward to 9:00 if you want to get straight into the history.

For more information:

http://sincereignorance.com/2014/08/06/black-americans-american-west-cowboys-towns-2/

http://sincereignorance.com/2014/08/06/black-americans-american-west-cowboys-towns/

https://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/arb01

http://www.blackcowboys.com/blackcowboys.htm

http://www.npr.org/2010/12/05/131761541/we-ve-all-heard-cowboy-songs-but-who-were-the-cowboys

Great Black Women in American History

The Light of Truth: Writings of an Anti-Lynching Crusader

Seventy-one years before Rosa Parks’s courageous act of resistance, police dragged a young black journalist named Ida B. Wells off a train for refusing to give up her seat. The experience shaped Wells’s career, and—when hate crimes touched her life personally—she mounted what was to become her life’s work: an anti-lynching crusade that captured international attention.

This volume covers the entire scope of Wells’s remarkable career, collecting her early writings, articles exposing the horrors of lynching, essays from her travels abroad, and her later journalism. The Light of Truth is both an invaluable resource for study and a testament to Wells’ long career as a civil rights activist.

An amazing woman, and human being; with a courage unmatched by many in society.

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