Albert Einstein and Civil Rights

Albert Einstein, a German-born theoretical physicist and philosopher of science, was also a passionate, committed anti-racist and stood for and with some of the most brilliant minds of the 20th century.

In addition to developing the general theory of relativity, his mass-energy equivalence formula (better known as E = mc2), and positioning his thoughts into one of the pillars of modern physics, Einstein was also the winner of the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics.

It is his history within the African-American community that has not had much exposure in the soon-to-be 60 years since his passing. What has been revealed has come courtesy of Fred Jerome and Rodger Taylor’s incredible book Einstein on Race and Racism (Rutgers University Press, 2006).

Throughout the 154-page recounting of Einstein’s life and legacy within the civil rights movement, readers are impressed to learn that he not only stood against racism, but delivered speeches and supported initiatives for education and against lynching.

Einstein’s efforts were routinely ignored by the mainstream press, which only highlighted his activities that weren’t geared toward an anti-racist agenda, as his collaborations with the likes of Paul Robeson,Lincoln University, and Marian Anderson are oftentimes overlooked.

Einstein Felt Blacks Were Treated The Way Jews Were In Germany

According to Jerome and Taylor, the mutual pens behind Einstein on Race and Racism, “Einstein realized that African-Americans in Princeton, N.J., were treated like Jews in Germany.” Einstein’s response to the blatant racism and segregation was to cultivate meaningful relationships within the town’s African-American community. In the book, elder blacks who still live in the town recall Einstein as a “white-haired, disheveled figure” who casually and calmly rolled through their streets, oftentimes stopping to strike up conversation with the locals, and handing out sweets to their children. Einstein lived in Princeton from 1933 until his death in 1955.

The writer William Faulkner once said, “History isn’t just a reflection of what was it’s also a reflection of what is.”

http://www.techtimes.com/articles/34617/20150224/black-history-month-6-ways-albert-einstein-supported-civil-rights.htm

http://www.inquisitr.com/1923798/why-is-albert-einsteins-history-with-the-african-american-civil-rights-movement-forgotten/

http://www.snopes.com/politics/quotes/einstein.asp

Commitment to Young Black Boys Give Great Results

I want to say, DUH; on the flip side I am glad the centuries of damage by purposely created poverty/poor education for Black Americans is having a turn around. A turn around due to commitment and not making excuses, because of the traps set up by society.

Schools in Oakland, California, may have found the key to closing the achievement gap between African-American males and other groups of students, according to a recent report.

In 2010, Oakland Unified School District (OUSD) began offering elective courses specifically for its lowest-performing students: African-American males. Several years later, the initiative, known as the Manhood Development Program (MDP), has been successful in narrowing achievement gaps and improving school culture, says the report from Vajra Watson, director of research and policy for equity at the University of California, Davis.

Read More

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/02/17/oakland-manhood-development-program_n_6665806.html?ncid=fcbklnkushpmg00000047

Tulsa Oklahoma: 1921

 

“Believed to be the single worst incident of racial violence in American history, the bloody 1921 Tulsa race riot has continued to haunt Oklahomans to the present day. During the course of eighteen terrible hours on May 31 and June 1, 1921, more than one thousand homes and businesses were destroyed, while credible estimates of riot deaths range from fifty to three hundred. By the time the violence ended, the city had been placed under martial law, thousands of Tulsans were being held under armed guard, and the state’s second-largest African American community had been burned to the ground.”

1) Given no money from the local, state or federal government after they were massacred and their establishments destroyed.

2) Given no moral support from their fellow American citizens.

3) Ignored throughout history and the survivors were never even given an issue of apology.

Know your history.

Read more: http://digital.library.okstate.edu/ENCYCLOPEDIA/ENTRIES/T/TU013.html

Much needed, it’s important to watch “Before They Die”.

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