Black Song: The Forge And The Flame

This book delves into the story of how Afro-American spiritual was hammered out. Author John Lovell, Jr. goes into great detail of how the African influence catapulted American folklore, and the origin of American popular music.  It also takes into consideration the diverse ethnic groups that came to the Americas and Caribbean from the African continent, also how that influenced African American music.

If a folk song ever grew to epic stature, it is the American Negro spiritual. The thousands of Black creators and irrepressible groups who picked up the songs and kept them alive and moving were certainly perpetually busy. They were spread all over the slave land for hundreds of years. The few thousands songs extent are thus hardly more than a tiny fraction of the total output.

http://sincereignorance.com/2014/10/11/a-history-of-african-american-music/

Darren Wilson Job Woes

ddddd

Darren Wilson, the former Ferguson, Missouri police officer who gunned down 18-year-old Michael Brown in August of 2014, is now crying that he can’t find a job as a police officer with any other department.

Wilson was, almost unbelievably, cleared of any and all criminal charges. But in spite of that, he told The New Yorker that his killing of the African American teenager is “too hot an issue, so it makes me unemployable.”Wilson now says that he lives in anonymity in an unnamed suburb of St. Louis.

What has he been doing since losing his job as a police officer?

No Police Department Will Hire Darren Wilson Now

http://www.thedailybeast.com/cheats/2015/08/03/no-one-will-hire-darren-wilson-as-a-cop.html

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/08/10/the-cop

RACE The Power of an Illusion Episode 1

The History of Major Slave Revolts; Americas and the Caribbean

The exact statistics of how many slave rebellions and revolts that took place are unknown, but historical records show there were many. American Negro Slave Revolts, by Herbert Aptheker concluded that there were at least 250 slave revolts within the United States alone prior to the year 1865, in addition to localized opposition. On record was also mutiny aboard slave ships, 155 on record; many success stories and many brutally suppressed mutinies.

According to African American Desk Reference, as early as 1522, slaves in Saint Domingue rose up in an attempt to create a African Republic; rebellious slaves destroyed the settlement of Santa Maria in Columbia.

Here are more recorded revolts.

1653 In Gloucester Virginia, a plot was betrayed by a man named Berkenhead (A White indentured servant); he was rewarded his freedom and 5,000 pounds of tobacco.

1658 Black slaves aided by Native Americans burned their masters’ homes in Hartford Connecticut.

1691 Mingoe, a Virginia slave escaped from his master; Mingoe gathered a group of followers and destroyed a number of plantations, mainly in Rappahannock County. The rebels acquired cattle, hogs and some guns. Sadly there wasn’t any documented account about their fate.

Discrimination against free blacks was more severe in Connecticut than in other New England colonies. Their lives were strongly proscribed even before they became numerous. In 1690, the colony forbade blacks and Indians to be on the streets after 9 p.m. It also forbid black “servants” to wander beyond the limits of the towns or places where they belonged without a ticket or pass from their masters or the authorities. A law of 1708, citing frequent fights between slaves and whites, imposed a minimum penalty of 30 lashes on any black who disturbed the peace or who attempted to strike a white person. Even speech was subject to control. By a 1730 law, and black, Indian, or mulatto slave “who uttered or published, about any white person, words which would be actionable if uttered by a free white was, upon conviction before any one assistant or justice of the peace, to be whipped with forty lashes.”

http://slavenorth.com/connecticut.htm

For more slave rebellions and revolts, go to Schomberg Center for research in Black culture; African American Desk Reference. 

International Decade for People of African Descent

TRNN was in Harlem this week to cover the commencement of the UN ‘International Decade for People of African Descent.’ Activist Opal Tometi, Actor Danny Glover and President of Venezuela, Nicolás Maduro were among those who spoke. They encouraged Black activists to build solidarity with the over 200 million people who claim African descent in the Americas.

To watch the entire story click here: http://bit.ly/1j1aj54

http://www.un.org/en/events/africandescentdecade/

TYT Commentators: Women in the Military

tyt

Onesimus: Smallpox Inoculation

smallpox

Thanks to the pioneering work of Onesimus, many lives were saved from the smallpox epidemic.

Onesimus (fl. 1706 – 1717), slave and medical pioneer, was born in the late seventeenth century, probably in West Africa, although the precise date and place of his birth are unknown. He first appears in the historical record in the diary of Cotton Mather, a prominent New England theologian and minister of Boston’s Old North Church. Reverend Mather notes in a diary entry for 13 December 1706 that members of his congregation purchased for him “a very likely Slave; a young Man who is a Negro of a promising aspect of temper” (Mather, vol. 1, 579). Mather named him Onesimus, after a biblical slave who escaped from his master, an early Christian named Philemon.

http://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/onesimus-fl-1706-1717-slave-and-medical-pioneer-was-born

The idea behind this radical new treatment came from Africa, specifically from a slave named Onesimus, who shared his knowledge with Cotton Mather, the town’s leading minister and his legal owner. Boston still suffered dreadfully, but thanks to Onesimus and Mather, the terror linked to smallpox began to recede after Africans rolled up their sleeves—literally—to show Boston how inoculation worked.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/ideas/2014/10/17/how-african-slave-helped-boston-fight-smallpox/XFhsMMvTGCeV62YP0XhhZI/story.html

http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/broughttolife/people/onesimus

http://www.jstor.org/stable/3491675?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

http://www.blackhistorypages.net/pages/onesimus.php

Inferiority Complex

0000kwame

Leadership Roles in the Black Community

Strong Leaders

The Missing Piece of Film History

film thumbnail

http://sincereignorance.com/2015/02/11/oscar-micheaux-film-industry-more/

%d bloggers like this: