Exodus: Gods and Kings Banned in Egypt Due to ‘Historical Inaccuracies’

According to many reports, Exodus has been banned in Egypt due to historical inaccuracies.

I’m all against censorship, no matter how inaccurate or stupid a film may be. People should have a right to see something, no matter how horrible or inaccurate it is. It’s freedom of choice, just as people have a right to create something stupid, people have a right to view something stupid. I think you’re on a slippery slope when you start banning things in the entertainment realm. I also highly doubt the film was banned due to ethnic historical inaccuracies, you know, like literally Anglo-Saxon actors playing African rulers. This has been the main criticism from American movie goers.

She’s supposed to be an Egyptian queen. And Idris Elba can play King George III.

I’m guessing it was due moreso to political and religious reasons. I could be wrong. Some articles cite this as a reason, though the quotes, so far, are unconfirmed.

Sources: 

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-30605059

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/news/exodus-gods-and-kings-banned-in-egypt-for-historical-inaccuracies-9945523.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/27/world/middleeast/egypt-has-reportedly-banned-exodus-gods-and-kings-movie.html?_r=0

Songhai Empire

The Songhai Empire, also known as the Songhay Empire, was the largest state in African history and the most powerful of the medieval west African states. It expanded rapidly beginning with King Sonni Ali in the 1460s and by 1500s, it had risen to stretch from Cameroon to the Maghreb. In 1360, disputes over succession weakened the Mali Empire, and in the 1430s, Songhai, previously a Mali dependency, gained independence under the Sonni Dynasty. Around thirty years later, Sonni Sulayman Dama attacked Mema, the Mali province west of Timbuktu, paving the way for his successor, Sonni Ali, to turn his country into one of the greatest empires Saharan Africa has ever seen.

Perhaps, it’s most popular leader was Muhammad Askia the Great. At its peak, the Songhai city of Timbuktu became a thriving cultural and commercial center. Arab, Italian and Jewish merchants all gathered for trade. By 1500, the Songhai Empire covered over 1.4 million square kilometers.

http://atlantablackstar.com/2013/12/05/7-midieval-african-kingdoms/2/

http://www.blackpast.org/gah/songhai-empire-ca-1375-1591

http://www.sahistory.org.za/topic/songhai-african-empire-15-16th-century

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/sghi/hd_sghi.htm

Kingdom of Ghana

Centered in what is today Senegal and Mauritania, the Kingdom of Ghana dominated West Africa between about 750 and 1078 A.D. Famous to North Africans as the “Land of Gold,” Ghana was said to possess sophisticated methods of administration and taxation, large armies, and a monopoly over notoriously well-concealed gold mines.

The king of the Soninke people who founded Ghana never fully embraced Islam, but good relations with Muslim traders were fostered. Ancient Ghana derived power and wealth from gold and the use of the camel increased the quantity of goods that were transported. One Arab writer, Al-Hamdani, describes Ghana as having the richest gold mines on Earth. Ghana was also a great military power. According to one narrative, the king had at his command 200,000 warriors and an additional 40,000 archers.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/africa/features/storyofafrica/4chapter1.shtml

http://atlantablackstar.com/2013/12/05/7-midieval-african-kingdoms/

http://themedievalages.weebly.com/africa-ancient-ghana.html

http://www.mapsofworld.com/world-ancient-history/ancient-ghana.html

http://www.ghanaweb.com/GhanaHomePage/history/ancient_ghana.php

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/ghan/hd_ghan.htm

Berber Dagger: Morocco

 

 

Ornamental daggers in Morocco intermingled with Moorish, Arabic and Berber cultures. This Berber dagger is from the central anti Atlas mountain region, south of the high Atlas Mountain range. The cord is old and original, as well as typical of the dagger type.

http://www.ezakwantu.com/Gallery%20African%20Weapons%20-%20West%20North%20and%20East%20African%20Weapons.htm

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