Deaf Ears, A Letter Written to John Stossel In 2012: Political Correctness

  Latti Nerd Gangsta

doctanian.latti@gmail.com

Minnesota, MN

5/2012

John Stossel

john.stossel@foxnews.com

5/2012

     Dear John Stossel,

I’m an avid viewer of your show Mr. Stossel; you bring many of the views I agree with up on your show and you also allow open discussions/topics from those of varying ideologies and opinions. It’s refreshing, especially how you let many express themselves, whether it’s correct or wrong. One episode did give me pause, even though I completely understood why Pat Buchanan was on your show; his views were not popular or accurate pertaining to ethnicity, and MSNBC gave him the boot because of it. I feel that decision was wrong, and not wise; why? Because it gave his comments legs to stand on and all views should be expressed in order for us to educate each other. At the same time freedom of expression and speech doesn’t not protect you from rebuttals from others and possibly losing your job, because of it. There is nothing stopping Buchanan from starting his own podcast, so he can have his delusional rants on race and president Obama.

I would love it, if you had some scholars that could give Pat Buchanan a respectful rebuttal. I wish I could do it myself, but talking in front of a live audience in general scares me. Comments like Pat’s do give off a false notion; “Minorities didn’t have any or little contributing factors to this country,” it is a dangerous and false notion. People really do believe Anglo Saxons are the sole builders of this nation or minorities did minimum contributions.  People express this attitude even though it was Black labor and innovation that made the U.S into an economic powerhouse. I would like to give you the unheard side of history, if you don’t mind.

The Revolutionary war wasn’t just fought by Anglo Saxon Americans, and we don’t only have European Founders of this nation. The Native people were the founders of The New World and were just as creative and sophisticated as some of the Europeans who landed on their shores. In addition to the forgotten free people’s of the continent of Africa who also came to the New World. The sad reality is, not only White Americans do not know these facts but many Black Americans as well. It’s not taught in school.


(In reference to this video)

Revolutionary War 

James Armistead Lafayette

(more…)

The War on Mental Illness

My aunt was recently arrested when she had one of her episodes; she is schizophrenic, and luckily the encounter with the cops in Kentucky didn’t lead to her death. She also has a family that was able to deal with the judicial system and now we are furthering her treatment. The top three groups who are killed in the U.S by police officers are the mentally ill, Black Americans and Native Americans.

Mentally Ill

http://www.npr.org/2015/07/04/420019849/paper-finds-one-quarter-of-those-killed-by-police-are-mentally-ill

Native Americans

http://mic.com/articles/109894/the-police-are-killing-one-group-at-a-staggering-rate-and-nobody-is-talking-about-it#.4hs1rUGKk

Black Americans

http://mic.com/articles/119970/25-actual-facts-about-police-brutality-in-america#.TzlzbXJrc

The History of Major Slave Revolts; Americas and the Caribbean

The exact statistics of how many slave rebellions and revolts that took place are unknown, but historical records show there were many. American Negro Slave Revolts, by Herbert Aptheker concluded that there were at least 250 slave revolts within the United States alone prior to the year 1865, in addition to localized opposition. On record was also mutiny aboard slave ships, 155 on record; many success stories and many brutally suppressed mutinies.

According to African American Desk Reference, as early as 1522, slaves in Saint Domingue rose up in an attempt to create a African Republic; rebellious slaves destroyed the settlement of Santa Maria in Columbia.

Here are more recorded revolts.

1653 In Gloucester Virginia, a plot was betrayed by a man named Berkenhead (A White indentured servant); he was rewarded his freedom and 5,000 pounds of tobacco.

1658 Black slaves aided by Native Americans burned their masters’ homes in Hartford Connecticut.

1691 Mingoe, a Virginia slave escaped from his master; Mingoe gathered a group of followers and destroyed a number of plantations, mainly in Rappahannock County. The rebels acquired cattle, hogs and some guns. Sadly there wasn’t any documented account about their fate.

Discrimination against free blacks was more severe in Connecticut than in other New England colonies. Their lives were strongly proscribed even before they became numerous. In 1690, the colony forbade blacks and Indians to be on the streets after 9 p.m. It also forbid black “servants” to wander beyond the limits of the towns or places where they belonged without a ticket or pass from their masters or the authorities. A law of 1708, citing frequent fights between slaves and whites, imposed a minimum penalty of 30 lashes on any black who disturbed the peace or who attempted to strike a white person. Even speech was subject to control. By a 1730 law, and black, Indian, or mulatto slave “who uttered or published, about any white person, words which would be actionable if uttered by a free white was, upon conviction before any one assistant or justice of the peace, to be whipped with forty lashes.”

http://slavenorth.com/connecticut.htm

For more slave rebellions and revolts, go to Schomberg Center for research in Black culture; African American Desk Reference. 

International Decade for People of African Descent

TRNN was in Harlem this week to cover the commencement of the UN ‘International Decade for People of African Descent.’ Activist Opal Tometi, Actor Danny Glover and President of Venezuela, Nicolás Maduro were among those who spoke. They encouraged Black activists to build solidarity with the over 200 million people who claim African descent in the Americas.

To watch the entire story click here: http://bit.ly/1j1aj54

http://www.un.org/en/events/africandescentdecade/

Natural Hair Movement Continue to Rise

natural

Relaxer Hair Sales Continue Decline as Black Hair Industry Aimed to Be Worth Over $774 Million

Inferiority Complex

0000kwame

Sincere Ignorance Podcast

Sincere Ignorance (7)

It’s here, the full, weekly podcast of Sincere Ignorance. A week early from its’ iTunes and Stitcher releases due to of the waiting period for the pending reviews and the fact I wanted critiques of any kind for improvement.

We’ve finally got our Youtube channel running. You can watch a series of new videos along with some revamped older ones. We’re committing to releasing at least one video a week. Subscribe, leave suggestions and tips.

This is not like our usual audio commentaries, this is the official promotional podcast.

First episode deals with the issue of classism, the following 2 episodes will deal with sexism and racism.

http://app.stitcher.com/splayer/f/68500/39642828

 

Brandon Brooks Has More Sense than the Adults and Officer in that Neighborhood

There were a lot of moronic adults stating that the officer who physically assaulted a 14 year girl and was randomly arresting Black teens at the pool party was justified. Many of them believed more cops were needed for 7 people who supposedly was trespassing, a brief altercation between a mother/daughter and loud music during the day. You also had two White men seemingly protecting the police officer who assaulted the 14 year old girl, from the dangerous non-threatening Black teens from a Middle Class neighborhood. Although Middle class for Black Americans doesn’t provide the same security. 15 year old Brandon Brooks put the officer and the rest of the community to shame with his account.

This isn’t new; White society has always made simple acts from Black individuals or a group seem threatening, as police are called for frivolous actions like walking in the cold with ones hands in his/her pockets. It is ironic that White society has created this image of the pathology of violence by Black Americans, when systemically they are the ones committing it. Yes, I use the word ‘They’, though many Whites aren’t racist, many still support the actions of institutions that are, and many hold racial biases knowingly or unknowingly.

Stating the facts of this reality doesn’t mean Black Americans are off the hook as well, since many allow themselves to perpetuate these falsehood against their own ethnic group. Which is why you see some making excuses for White societies inaction or self internalizes negative beliefs against people who look like them.

And let us not forget…………..

David Walker: One of the Greatest Appeals Ever Written

David Walker and Maria Stewart (Maria will be touched upon in a separate piece) was the precursor to Black nationalism and unity. David expressed how he felt about both the Republican and Democratic party; they didn’t care about the plight of African Americans. He felt that people of African descent had a right to be treated as equals under the law and deserved respect for building The United States of America. It wasn’t just African Americans free-labor that propelled the U.S into the forefront, but their ingenuity as well. Creating crops like rice, knowing how to work the land more efficiently than their European counter-parts. The few who came over as free peoples and the vast majority who came over as slaves brought needed skills with them. Skills that if left absent would have made America a footnote in history.

This invigorated freedom fighting spirit is what made David Walker public enemy number one in the U.S, because he didn’t sugarcoat anything to make it more palatable to White society.

http://docsouth.unc.edu/nc/walker/walker.html

People have to comprehend that the Puritan work ethic as Martin Luther King eloquently stated, didn’t build America; Black Americans did. Free Black Americans were taxed higher than any other ethnic group. (Which still lives on today in many areas of the U.S like Ferguson). Every facet within Black culture was marginalized, while being used as profit at the same time.

People of African descent did not sit back to leave their fate within the hands of White society. Unlike popular belief, the major reason why slavery was abolished was due to the tenacity of African Americans/Caribbean/South America. From the slave revolts, to the creation of Abolitionist, and to their uncompromising integrity.

Albert Einstein and Civil Rights

Albert Einstein, a German-born theoretical physicist and philosopher of science, was also a passionate, committed anti-racist and stood for and with some of the most brilliant minds of the 20th century.

In addition to developing the general theory of relativity, his mass-energy equivalence formula (better known as E = mc2), and positioning his thoughts into one of the pillars of modern physics, Einstein was also the winner of the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics.

It is his history within the African-American community that has not had much exposure in the soon-to-be 60 years since his passing. What has been revealed has come courtesy of Fred Jerome and Rodger Taylor’s incredible book Einstein on Race and Racism (Rutgers University Press, 2006).

Throughout the 154-page recounting of Einstein’s life and legacy within the civil rights movement, readers are impressed to learn that he not only stood against racism, but delivered speeches and supported initiatives for education and against lynching.

Einstein’s efforts were routinely ignored by the mainstream press, which only highlighted his activities that weren’t geared toward an anti-racist agenda, as his collaborations with the likes of Paul Robeson,Lincoln University, and Marian Anderson are oftentimes overlooked.

Einstein Felt Blacks Were Treated The Way Jews Were In Germany

According to Jerome and Taylor, the mutual pens behind Einstein on Race and Racism, “Einstein realized that African-Americans in Princeton, N.J., were treated like Jews in Germany.” Einstein’s response to the blatant racism and segregation was to cultivate meaningful relationships within the town’s African-American community. In the book, elder blacks who still live in the town recall Einstein as a “white-haired, disheveled figure” who casually and calmly rolled through their streets, oftentimes stopping to strike up conversation with the locals, and handing out sweets to their children. Einstein lived in Princeton from 1933 until his death in 1955.

The writer William Faulkner once said, “History isn’t just a reflection of what was it’s also a reflection of what is.”

http://www.techtimes.com/articles/34617/20150224/black-history-month-6-ways-albert-einstein-supported-civil-rights.htm

http://www.inquisitr.com/1923798/why-is-albert-einsteins-history-with-the-african-american-civil-rights-movement-forgotten/

http://www.snopes.com/politics/quotes/einstein.asp

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