3 Animations You Can Support

newblack

Warning, use of profanity. 

Kariba: The synopsis is brilliant, and is rooted in realism; the dam created in Nubia/North Sudan, displaced a lot of Nubians. In addition to that, destroying pieces from the past of ancient Nubian culture. Some of the artifacts had to be evacuated to a different country. This fantasy teaser is not only stunning with an underlining social commentary, but it will empower little Black/African girls; by seeing themselves in such a light. A light of courage and fighting against any obstacle put in front of you, no matter how big they seem.

Website: http://www.karibamovie.com/#home

Tephlon Funk: A series created by Stephane Metayer about a young girl from Queensbridge who’s life turns upside down. It’s heavily inspired by both Hip Hop & Japanese Anime. The words “Tephlon Funk!” is a state of mind which means to be strong and stand out.”

Stylish, sleek, with some old school flavor and extremely smart. The use of Hip Hop as their instrument, and how it is intertwined within the fabric of Tephlon Funk is indeed ‘Dope’.

http://tephlonfunk.com/

E.X.O The Legend of Wale Williams: Tricked into returning home to Nigeria after a five year absence, an impetuous young man named Wale (pronounced Wah-leh) Williams embarks on a journey to investigate his father’s mysterious disappearance. His only clue is a cryptic Nanosuit left behind for him by his father, a suit which grants superhuman abilities. As he comes to understand the suit’s powers, Wale realizes he must restore hope to the city by preventing catastrophic attacks from the sociopathic extremist, Oniku.”

An heroic tale of a man trying to defend the city that he loves and carry on his father’s mantle. I love the look and feel of E.X.O, and its’ futuristic style. Keep in mind the video trailer is not the final cut, and the final production will be visually breathtaking. This is why E.X.O grabs the number 3 spot for me.

http://youneekstudios.com/

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Oscar Micheaux, Film Industry & More

http://www.biography.com/people/oscar-micheaux-9407584

Black Film Industry Before Oscar

As centennial commemorations of DW Griffith’s “Birth of a Nation” gear up, a new book by historian Cara Caddoo proves African Americans helped invent the movies a decade before the first Hollywood film. Published by Harvard University Press, “Envisioning Freedom: Cinema and the Building of Modern Black Life” uncovers the forgotten history of black inventors, filmmakers, and exhibitors.

“A lot of people assume that African Americans just followed in the footsteps of white filmmakers,” says Caddoo, an Assistant Professor at Indiana University, Bloomington, “That’s really a whitewashing of American film history.”

Years before the 1915 debut of Griffith’s pro-KKK film, which is widely credited for inaugurating “modern American cinema,” African Americans produced their own films and built their own theaters. Caddoo explains that this began in the 1890s–more than a decade before Hollywood, and long before the rise of better-known black filmmakers like Oscar Micheaux.

When “Birth of a Nation” debuted, African Americans launched the first mass black protest movement of the twentieth century. By that time, motion pictures were deeply integrated into black life. African Americans had produced films and used them to fundraise, build businesses, construct theaters, and socialize in an era of racial segregation. Caddoo explains, “They were fighting to reclaim a form of popular culture that they had helped create. Tens of thousands of African Americans participated–housewives, gangsters, ministers, and schoolchildren, from Hawaii to Massachusetts, and from the Panama Canal to Canada.”

http://blogs.indiewire.com/shadowandact/new-book-shows-african-americans-helped-invent-the-movies-20150209

http://www.amazon.com/Horror-Noire-Blacks-American-Present/dp/0415880203#

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-book-shows-african-americans-helped-invent-the-movies-300032588.html

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