Truth Behind the Myth: Homosexuality in Africa

ghana

British colonial overlords did commit the original sin. Some of the most murderously anti-gay countries of this century were first introduced to codified homophobia via former Western rulers—especially Britain, a true path-breaker in anti-gay oppression.

http://foreignpolicy.com/2012/06/19/british-colonialism-and-anti-gay-laws/

Among such criminalization cases, a common narrative is that acceptance and tolerance of homosexuality is a foreign, or alien, Western imposition on indigenous cultures.  For example, Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe has called homosexuality an invention of the West that will “disturb the African moral fabric.” Similarly, Gambian President Yahya Jammeh called homosexuals “satanic”, and President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf framed Liberia’s anti-sodomy laws as “traditional values.

Here stands one of the biggest ironies.  The idea that the so-called tolerance towards homosexuality somehow sprang from a western source doesn’t hold.  As our research shows, this narrative is not only wrong-headed but the opposite of the historical facts.  Instead, for many countries, including some of those mentioned above, criminalization laws were based on British imperial legal instruments, like the Indian Penal Code Section 377A, introduced and imposed on these countries by Britain when they were colonized.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/monkey-cage/wp/2014/10/30/the-british-colonial-origins-of-anti-gay-laws/

So this is to all of my conscious brothers and sisters (no sarcasm), if you really are about being anti-colonialism then you shouldn’t be promoting the same nonsense. There have been gay people in all parts of the world, and for the longest time African kingdoms and countries like India were far ahead of their time with their attitudes towards homosexuality. Now many of those same countries and forward thinking people are stuck in this mental glitch and paradox. On one hand we want to espouse to everything that was African pre-colonialism, while holding on to a colonialist way of thinking.

Confederate Flag Controversy

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American Bandit + Black Literary Magazines

https://i2.wp.com/wvs.topleftpixel.com/photos/2013/02/two-men_snow_back-alley_tall_01.jpg

From the darkness, I approached a woman with a daringness and audacity not seen since the Old West. Her brown eyes lit up. I flashed a gun and any intention of heroics died in an instant. I aimed the barrel at her chest and she froze; her silk green dress ruffled in the wind.

But those shock-stricken eyes were familiar. Thick, white lines of cocaine had nearly erased my memory, but not of her. I blinked and she came back in flashes. I remembered her short, curly black hair and her smooth, dark skin. Danielle, the woman I once loved.

My confident smirk faded and my head sunk low like broken ships into the cold harbor. A shadow lingered above me, not below. She said my name, asking if I needed help. The worry in her voice was a needle to my heart. I could feel the spots and blotches dotted along my arm. I needed help. I needed her.

I didn’t want help, though. Help strangely always arrived and handcuffed me. The blue bandits. Red and blue lights flicked in my eyes just thinking of them. I didn’t want to risk rotting. A drizzle of rain pattered on the worn sleeves of my jacket as I contemplated both lunacy and salvation.

“Just give me the money,” I said.

I closed my eyes held out my hand, expecting crumpled bills or a credit card on my palm. After a few seconds of silence, a soft hand wrapped around mine and squeezed gently. Whispers of support floated through the air.

I squeezed back.

——————————————————–

I’ve been reading more, so that’s inspired me to write more. Not my best work, fairly heavy-handed, but pretty decent for 15 minutes. I’ve been struggling between activist and artist for the past year now.

I’m leaning more towards artist.

Black Literary Magazines to check for:

http://www.unionstationmag.com/issues-3/

http://www.spectermagazine.com/

http://www.ebony.com/entertainment-culture/new-literary-magazine-spook-228#.VQh5M-FsWM8

The Boondocks: In Hindsight

Season 4 of the Boondocks was probably one of the best examples of Seasonal Rot, where a show gets progressively worse with each season. Which is sad, because the show had some of the cleverest writing, most beautiful animation, and likable characters I’ve seen in a long time.

For me, seasons 1 and 2 are perfection of comedic satire. While season 2 was more outlandish and less grounded in reality than Season 1, it captured the feel of the comic strip perfectly. The show constantly caused controvery from having Dr. King say the N-word to directly calling out BET in two episodes. Season 3 lost the social commentary, but not the humor.

Season 4, neither profound nor funny, was panned.

Aaron McGruder, the creator of the season had suddenly left. And once season 4 was announced, his lack of involvement was announced soon after:

“As the world now knows, The Boondocks will be returning for a fourth season, but I will not be returning with it. I’d like to extend my gratitude to Sony and Adult Swim for three great seasons”.

“I created The Boondocks two decades ago in college, did the daily comic for six years, and was showrunner on the animated series for the first three seasons. The Boondocks pretty much represents my life’s work to this point. Huey, Riley, and Granddad are not just property to me. They are my fictional blood relatives. Nothing is more painful than to leave them behind”.

“To quote a great white man, ‘Hollywood is a business’. And to quote another great white man, “Don’t hold grudges”.

“What has never been lost on me is the enormous responsibility that came with The Boondocks – particularly the television show and it’s relatively young audience. It was important to offend, but equally important to offend for the right reasons. For three seasons I personally navigated this show through the minefields of controversy. It was not perfect. And it definitely was not quick. But it was always done with a keen sense of duty, history, culture, and love. Anything less would have been simply unacceptable”.

“As for me, I’m finally putting a life of controversy and troublemaking behind me with my upcoming Adult Swim show, BLACK JESUS”. –

Source

In my opinion, either 1 of 2 things happened:

1: He lost the rights in a dispute.

2: He sold the Boondocks to move on to other projects.

Either one is unfortunate, but based on his “don’t hold grudges” comment, I’m guessing he lost the rights to his show.

The Boondocks was a property that could’ve been handed down to the right people, and could’ve gone in so many different directions.

Take the concept is that Huey is in love for example. Whether it’s with Jasmine or another cynical radical revolutionary remains to be seen. Perhaps, never to be seen. There are probably hundreds of writers slamming their heads on the keyboard. A show that had so much more to dive into.

There were entire arcs from the comics that could’ve made great material for the show, yet were completely abandoned. Like when Huey and Caesar (who was never introduced in the TV show) tried to create an alternative media outlet.

Or Jasmine’s struggle with racial identity.

Or day to day racial prejudice.

I haven’t even bother to watch Black Jesus, not because I think it’s bad. But because it truly seems like this one gag of “how funny would a black Jesus be?”. Same with Black Dynamite, while hilarious, it’s often void of the social consciousness that the Boondocks has (or had). And because it’s a period piece, you don’t get to see much outside 70’s African American culture. Whereas the Boondocks is the something where you can comment on African American culture, history, and progression as a whole.

This is why, personally, I’m always wary when people of color decide to sell off their ideas and brands. Like when the natural hair company and African American owned Carol’s Daughter was bought by L’Oreal Monpolizes and cooperate is something that can screw over anyone of any ethnic background, but in a country where minorities already own so little, for once, I’d like to see this trend end. Something becoming mainstream and then taken over.

On the bright side, these rights can be bought back,

But for now, the Boondocks has become a parody of itself.

Sources

http://colorlines.com/archives/2014/03/aaron_mcgruder_sorta_explains_why_he_left_the_boondocks.html

http://blogs.indiewire.com/shadowandact/aaron-mcgruder-finally-explains-why-he-left-the-boondocks

http://www.okayplayer.com/news/aaron-mcgruder-not-involved-boondocks-fourth-season.html

http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2014/10/24/358263731/a-black-cosmetic-company-sells-or-sells-out

Africans and The Making of the Americas: Part 4, Agriculture

There was a desperate need for African agricultural skills in the Americas.

Diverse groups of Africans from the coastal regions were highly skilled at clearing and cultivating forest land, an expertise that was unknown to Europeans at the time. One African technique involved burning delineated sections of forest and later using the ash for fertilizer, this had to be done carefully. Many also knew how to raise crops in semi-tropical and tropical soils; high temperatures and heavy rains cause nutrients to seep out more quickly than they do in temperate climates.

The complex art of rice cultivation practiced by West Africans for centuries rescued the U.S. The technique and technology used for rice cultivation was unknown by Europeans outside of southern Italy at the time. Rice cultivation was one of the most difficult types of work one could do, working in knee-deep water every day. By 1750, South Carolina became the rice-growing center of North America; rice was the colony’s major export. Other crops introduce by Africans include, black-eyed peas, pumpkins, sesame seeds, kola nuts, cotton, yams, sorghum, muskmelon, and water-melon.

The agricultural skills of Africans and African-Americans garnered extraordinary wealth for the Americas and Europe.

List of Crops Introduced by Africans/African-Americans

black-eyed peas

pumpkins

sesame seeds

kola nuts

cotton

yams

sorghum

muskmelon

water-melon

okra

tania

kidney beans

lima beans

millet

red peas

Source:

http://www.nypl.org/locations/schomburg

http://slaverebellion.org/index.php?page=crops-slave-cuisines

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/03/140301-african-american-food-history-slavery-south-cuisine-chefs/

 Part 1: http://sincereignorance.com/2015/01/27/africans-and-the-making-of-the-americas-part-1-exploration/

Part 2: http://sincereignorance.com/2015/01/27/africans-and-the-making-of-the-americas-part-2-mining/

Part 3: http://sincereignorance.com/2015/02/03/africans-and-the-making-of-the-americas-part-3-herding/

Exodus: Gods and Kings Banned in Egypt Due to ‘Historical Inaccuracies’

According to many reports, Exodus has been banned in Egypt due to historical inaccuracies.

I’m all against censorship, no matter how inaccurate or stupid a film may be. People should have a right to see something, no matter how horrible or inaccurate it is. It’s freedom of choice, just as people have a right to create something stupid, people have a right to view something stupid. I think you’re on a slippery slope when you start banning things in the entertainment realm. I also highly doubt the film was banned due to ethnic historical inaccuracies, you know, like literally Anglo-Saxon actors playing African rulers. This has been the main criticism from American movie goers.

She’s supposed to be an Egyptian queen. And Idris Elba can play King George III.

I’m guessing it was due moreso to political and religious reasons. I could be wrong. Some articles cite this as a reason, though the quotes, so far, are unconfirmed.

Sources: 

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-30605059

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/news/exodus-gods-and-kings-banned-in-egypt-for-historical-inaccuracies-9945523.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/27/world/middleeast/egypt-has-reportedly-banned-exodus-gods-and-kings-movie.html?_r=0

Bill O’Reilly: White Power Structure

This isn’t about Democrats vs. Republicans to me; some White Americans genuinely feel this in both parties, nor is this about being pro NAACP.

The ‘Racial Empathy Gap’

According to Policy Mic writer Zak Cheney-Rice, “This idea comes from research done at the University of Toronto-Scarborough and the University of Milano-Bicocca. Findings suggest that people of all racial groups empathize less with Black people than they do other races.” White people don’t know that Black people can have similar lives as they can. It comes from cultural ignorance.

http://atlantablackstar.com/2014/10/30/5-reasons-why-white-people-dont-go-see-black-movies/

http://sincereignorance.com/reality-check/black-on-black-crime-myth-or-reality/

I’m Loving It: Great Black Heroes Website

About:

This site looks as many of the Black heroes in the course of history, pioneers and ground breakers in different fields, and brings recognition to those who have worked to overcome obstacles to become heroes.

The site is meant to inspire those who face challenges in chasing their dreams so they they may one day become heroes to their community and to society in general.

The site includes profiles of each hero, as well as podcasts and videos. We hope that you find this site useful and would love to hear comments and suggestions.

While the site helps to provide a focus on some of the heroes of Black history, it is not just about Black history, it is about all of our history.

Read and learn more:

http://www.greatblackheroes.com/

Podcast:

http://www.greatblackheroes.com/podcasts/

Why posts like this are no longer of interest to me?

Beyond Ignorance

 

I am not going back to posts or any other purposely misdirected racial drivel anymore; conversing with others in that much of a cesspool is pointless and worthless.

There are a lot of things that are debatable, and I’m open for that but 99% of the things the user said is moronic. Someone like that is far beyond my reach, and I’m sure her views on Black Americans doesn’t fair better.

Whatever she feels to be the stereotypical African plight/genetics or stereotypical Black person isn’t of my concern. At least not towards her; in addition to myself thinking that certain stereotypes are retarded anyway. Who cares if many Black people like a healthy fruit like water-melon, or many like fried chicken? I never thought it to be funny, and it isn’t stereotypical; it is just a jedi-mind-trick to make others feel insecure about things they shouldn’t feel insecure about. In this stage in my life I am way above that.

So I’ll leave you guys/ladies with this:

Racism Insurance: Coverage for White Privilege

Just to give some people a heads up; it was also picking on the fact that some men think it is okay to call women in their own ethnic group hoes, but outside of that particular ethnic group, you can’t call another ethnic group of women hoes. Basically saying sexism is okay if it is perpetrated by Black men about Black women, but not White men to Black women.

So this isn’t just showcasing the stupidity or ignorance of some White Americans but Black Americans as well.

Not only men as well:

You can follow us on Sound Cloud and Youtube as well :-)…subscribe.

http://sincereignorance.com/2014/10/23/racism-insurance-coverage-for-white-privilege/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCty6jSVkP__Bo91yb7ri6iA

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