Extremism and Terrorism Within Religion Isn’t New: The KKK and Woodrow Wilson

There were Black towns burned to the ground (Tulsa, Black Wall-street), Black bodies swinging (men, women and children), a judicial system that protected the worse of society and our political leaders who supported terrorism. This wasn’t the Middle East, but the United States of America that lead the flag in terrorism of their own citizens to which they lived in terror and when they fought back were given a heavy blow of how monstrous their fellowman can be.

Mick Jenkins: Chicago Hip Hop

The Water[s]

Chicago has undergone a creative renaissance in the past few years, one of a depth few anticipated. Compared with earlier regional moments, where local buzz propelled a handful of artists to the national stage, the Internet’s clear-glass window into this world—and the increased marketing savvy of even its least-established teenagers—has made the city’s multiple scenes appear saturated. This is further exaggerated by the reams of imitators the city’s bigger stars—Chief Keef and Chance the Rapper—have inspired. With limited oxygen in a competitive space, a raft of rookie artists have stubbornly hoisted themselves into the air, grasping for whichever angle best fits.

Jazz 

Black Sheep

Comfortable

http://pitchfork.com/reviews/albums/19745-mick-jenkins-the-waters/

http://www.hotnewhiphop.com/mick-jenkins-the-water-s-new-mixtape.115188.html

Son Little – “Your Love Will Blow Me Away When My Heart Aches”

Black Messiah D’Angelo: The Vanguard-Really Love

D’ Angelo’s New Album

My Commentary

I’ve always loved D’Angelo’s music and this album is now added to my roster as well. I grew up on the Neo Soul sound; Maxwell, D’Angelo, Erykah Badu, Lauryn Hill and the list goes on. D’Angelo was a power house and in the same league as his contemporaries until personal issues caused him to take a long hiatus, but that can be said for many of the greats (cough Lauryn Hill). I also don’t have to remind people why he is in such an elite league with albums like Brown Sugar and Voodoo. D’ Angelo always had the talent of mixing different aspects of African/Black American culture into an amazing stew of sound. This album is no different, it just has a extra dose of political and social commentary. Especially in light of the recent tragedies pertaining to police brutality that has finally surfaced into mainstream media again since 1992 (Rodney King) or the 60’s for that matter.

This album was a must and greatly needed; not only is the social commentary there, but the musicality is devastatingly good. Again not surprising if you’ve listened to D’Angelo’s overall resume. Some damn good music. Now let’s get into the tracks with The Needle Drop.

D’Angelo and The Vanguard-Black Messiah 

http://www.amazon.com/Black-Messiah-DAngelo-And-Vanguard/dp/B00QR7ZN16

This album is a 9.5

Exploring New Orleans in 48 Hours

Cab Calloway’s Hi De Ho:1934

Billie Holiday; Billie Holiday’s Story

http://www.billieholiday.com/

http://www.pbs.org/jazz/biography/artist_id_holiday_billie.htm

http://www.biography.com/people/billie-holiday-9341902

Should you leave yourself open by depending on others?

 It’s nice to have people you trust and can rely on in your life, but it is always best to build yourself up. What do I mean by that? People can and sometimes will disappoint you; friends, family and co-workers. Those disappointments can leave you stranded, or leave you behind on your work and your ambitions in life. There have been moments where I have missed out on opportunities by waiting on others and it was my own fault at the end of the day. Yes it is harder learning new things or having to work from the ground up instead of relying on a friend/co-worker who already has that particular skill set, but if you are passionate about your craft then you’ll take the time to learn. Leave a comment if you’ve been through something along the lines of this topic, and how did you handle it? 

Having said that, I’ll leave you with Nat King Cole & George Shearing: “Pick Yourself Up”.

A History of African American Music

Click Below to Explore

 http://www.carnegiehall.org/honor/history/

1972 Modern Jazz Quartet: Charlie Mingus

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