Selma Movie: Glory Video

http://www.selmamovie.com/

New Hip Hop Album: Akala, Banquet of Thieves

Rating 9

Freddie King

Freddie King (September 3, 1934 – December 28, 1976), thought to have been born as Frederick Christian in Gilmer, Texas, originally recording as Freddy King, and nicknamed “the Texas Cannonball”, was an influential African-American blues guitarist and singer. He is often mentioned as one of “the Three Kings” of electric blues guitar, along with Albert King and B.B. King (though he was the youngest of the three).

http://www.last.fm/music/Freddie+King/+images

http://www.allmusic.com/artist/freddie-king-mn0000186734

Screamin’ Jay Hawkins

Loved his music and style; he was the Dr. Strange of Blues/Rock music.

Born on July 18, 1929, in Cleveland, Ohio, “Screamin'” Jay Hawkins was a piano prodigy and boxer who worked with Fats Domino and Tiny Grimes. Hawkins had a hit in 1956 with his bombastic take on “I Put a Spell on You.” His career became known for its wild stage antics, with the singer wearing bones and rising out of coffins. After later appearances in film, he died on February 12, 2000 in France.

Breakthrough Song

In the early 1950s, Hawkins worked such artists as Tiny Grimes and Fats Domino before striking out on his own. It took two tries to score a hit with his best-known song, “I Put a Spell on You.” The first version for Okeh Records failed to attract listeners.

During his next attempt for Columbia Records, he and the studio musicians drank heavily during the recording session. The result, which Hawkins claimed not to remember recording, was a bluesy, voodoo-tinged single filled with boisterous vocals, including moans and other sound effects. This version gave him his first hit in 1956.

http://www.biography.com/people/screamin-jay-hawkins-246007

Albums

http://www.amazon.com/Screamin-Jay-Hawkins/e/B000APWFP8

http://www.besteveralbums.com/thechart.php?b=5334

Talib Kweli feat. Abby Dobson – State of Grace

In the new video for his track ‘State Of Grace’ ft. Abby Dobson, Talib Kweli tackles issues about what it feels like for a woman who loves hip-hop and/or grew up listening to hip-hop. “Lost count of how many whores she was called today”, “ain’t never been a bitch or a ho but she used to sing along when she heard it in a song”, are among the powerful lyrics.

http://www.afropunk.com/profiles/blogs/feature-misogyny-in-hip-hop-talib-kweli-speaks-out-again-in-new

Talib’s album

Banjo Ancestors and Its Origin

Though many people think that the banjo is the all-American instrument, born and developed in the good ol’ U. S. of A., they’re only telling you a partial truth and a very small part of the whole story. What they are thinking of is the 5-string banjo donned by such greats as Earl Scruggs and Bela Fleck. It’s the most prevalent type of banjo in many popular styles of American music such as Bluegrass, Dixieland, and Country, so naturally, being exposed to no other types of banjos, one would assume that the 5-string IS the banjo.

In reality the banjo originated hundreds of years ago somewhere on the African continent. These instruments were quite simple and rough – an animal skin tacked on to a hollowed half of a gourd with three or four strings stretched over a planed stick (keep in mind, too, that there were no such things as frets back then). The strings were often made from waxed horsehair or gut. One name for this instrument was the banjar. (Isn’t it interesting that the pronunciation of this native-African word from ages ago is still being used by the back-woodsy American folk of today?) Anyway…

The story of the banjo begins in the 17th century when African slaves in the New World began making and playing lute-type string instruments with drum-like gourd bodies. In 1678, the French colonial government of Martinique restated an edict issued twenty four years earlier prohibiting African slaves from gathering together for dances and socializing. The new ordinance specified kalendas. More commonly known as la calinda(also calenda), the kalenda was a social gathering of slaves in which they danced dances of clear African origin to the accompaniment of a drum or two and the banza. (In later years, some reports also mentioned the inclusion of the violin in a typical calinda band.)

Eleven years later, Sir Hans Sloane wrote the first report of the early banjo which gave a description of the instrument. In the account of his 1687 sojourn through the West Indies (written in 1689 but not published until 1707), Sir Hans described the “Negroes” in Jamaica as playing strum-strums, which were “Instruments in imitation of Lutes, made from small Gourds fitted with Necks, strung with Horse hairs, or the peeled stalks of climbing Plants or Withs.”

http://www.musicfolk.com/docs/Features/Feature_Banjo.htm

http://www.shlomomusic.com/banjoancestors_earlybanjos.htm

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/banjo

J. Cole: Earlier That Day

J. Rosamond Johnson: American History

J. Rosamond Johnson was one of many black American composers who were inspired by the music of Afro-English composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor. “Nobody Knows” appeared as part of “The Books of American Negro Spirituals,” by Johnson and his brother, James Weldon Johnson. J. Rosamond Johnson writes in the score of Nobody Knows, “This is a rare version,” and dedicates his arrangement to Henry Krehbiel. It is the alternate tune to the familiar, standard version of this spiritual.

Rodrick Dixon’s moving performance of “Nobody Knows De Trouble I See” was filmed in Portland, Maine, in October 2012 as part of production for the documentary film “Samuel Coleridge-Taylor and His Music in America, 1900-1912.” Photo of J. Rosamond Johnson used with permission of Melanie Edwards, JRJ’s granddaughter. For more information visit:
http://www.longfellowchorus.com/samue…

Composer, actor, and pioneer in his field, John Rosamond Johnson was one of the most successful of the early African American composers. Born on August 11, 1873 in Jacksonville, Florida, Johnson was the younger brother of prominent composer and civil rights leader James Weldon Johnson. Starting in 1890, John Johnson attended Boston’s New England Conservatory, and for a brief time studied in Europe as well. He began his career as a music teacher in Jacksonville public schools but in 1899 moved to New York with his brother, James Weldon, to pursue a career in show business. One year later the Johnson brothers established a song writing partnership with Robert “Bob” Cole, a lyricist and vaudeville entertainer. Their working relationship lasted until Cole’s death in 1911 and would prove to be quite profitable, producing two popular all-black operettas on Broadway, The Shoo-Fly Regiment (1906) and The Red Moon (1908). With Cole, Johnson also wrote Congo Love Songs, My Castle on the Nile, and the enormously successful Under the Bamboo Tree in 1902. – See more at: http://www.blackpast.org/aah/johnson-j-rosamond-1873-1954#sthash.6teF1m7S.dpuf

http://jass.com/c&j.html

http://www.allmusic.com/artist/j-rosamond-johnson-mn0001396567/biography

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