Wesley Brown: Civil Engineer Corps

He had to endure a lot of hate and violence in order to receive his engineering degree.

Brown graduated in 1949 with an engineering degree, and was assigned to the Navy Civil Engineering Services Department.  He served 20 years in the Navy’s Civil Engineer Corps where he built houses in Hawaii, roads in Liberia, wharves in the Philippines, a nuclear power plant in Antarctica and a desalination plant in Cuba. He rose to the rank of lieutenant commander and retired in 1969.

– See more at: http://www.blackpast.org/aah/brown-wesley-1927#sthash.7mlAmNa6.dpuf

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/25/us/wesley-brown-first-black-naval-graduate-dies-at-85.html

Daniel Holtzclaw Allegedly Raped 13 Woman

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13 Black women were allegedly raped by officer Holtzclaw who is currently on trial. The jury is all White and the trial has already turned into destroying the testimonies of the witnesses do to past mistakes or using character flaws as a tactic of discrediting.

Black and Guilty

Why didn’t he go straight home? Why didn’t she put her phone away or leave the classroom, why did he run from the officer? All and more questions that have been used to rationalize or justify excessive force by officers and power crazed civilians who have  assaulted or killed innocent individuals. In the American public eyes, a Black victim has to be inhumanly unfathomable to be humanized; any character flaw is used as justification. Unlike White perpetrators who do horrific crimes; society tries to rationalize it by stating they have mental issues, maybe a poor upbringing, and other tactics the media goes to in order to show some humanity within a criminal. Interesting how Black victims are not afforded the same analysis.

The Child In Question

A lawyer for the 16-year-old student at Spring Valley High School in Columbia, South Carolina who was seen in a viral video being flipped over in her desk by a school resource officer, says the girl suffered injuries from the attack, according to the New York Daily News.

The lawyer, Todd Rutherford, told the News that his client suffered injuries to her face, neck, and arm. He also noted that she lives in foster care.

Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott announced Wednesday that the deputy, Ben Fields, who worked at the school as a resource officer, has been fired. But the sheriff placed the blame for the incident squarely on the shoulders of the child, essentially saying ‘she started it.’

The girl who was arrested was known as the quiet type and non-responsive daily. She didn’t speak to anyone, from what the students stated. There goes the verbal combative non-sense people were trying to spin it to. She is in orphan, so what do excuse makers have to say now?

Here is what classmate Niya states:

I commend Niya for defending her classmate and not blindly following authority. Niya doesn’t know the student who was violently thrown like a rag-doll personally, but she knows the difference between wrong and right apparently.

Lastly, arrested for disruption in class; are you freaking kidding me? What type of asinine crap have we allowed to seep into the American psyche, where arresting kids for being disruptive in class is okay? People were mad at attorney general Eric Holder (who I am indifferent towards) when he said, “America is a nation of cowards”. He was right to an extent, there are many cowards in American society who allow this police state to not only do harm to adults, but now our children. On top of that, the cowards try to extract the brave accolades of other Americans who had courage like Martin L. King as a reason of why the nation isn’t filled with cowards.

For most students, the pipeline begins with inadequate resources in public schools. Overcrowded classrooms, a lack of qualified teachers, and insufficient funding for “extras” such as counselors, special edu­cation services, and even textbooks, lock students into second-rate educational environments. This failure to meet educational needs increases disengagement and dropouts, increasing the risk of later court ­involvement. (1) Even worse, schools may actually encourage dropouts in response to pressures from test-based accountability regimes such as the No Child Left Behind Act, which create incentives to push out low-performing students to boost overall test scores. (2)

https://www.aclu.org/fact-sheet/what-school-prison-pipeline

Black people on American shores have always been seen as innately criminal. This assumption of criminality traces back beyond before the very birth of this country. Even after Americans won their independence in the Revolutionary War, blacks who tried to escape from or fight their way out of enslavement were seen as thieves, stealing their own bodies from someone else.

The assumption of black criminality bears out in a variety of ways. Blacks only make up about 13 percent of the American population, but account for nearly half of the country’s prison population. Blacks are six times more likely to be incarcerated than whites, and they are sentenced for longer periods and put to death at higher rates than whites who commit the same crimes. The penal system aspires to be a state-sponsored reform program, but prison doesn’t exist in its current form as an attempt to rehabilitate black people so much as to remove them from society altogether.

Maybe it was the bystander effect, as to why others beside Niya, stood up for her classmate. I not only have a problem with the officer, but the school administrator and the teacher.

http://theconcourse.deadspin.com/there-are-no-innocent-black-people-1739019535

Black Teen Unlawfully Detained: Banking While Black

Some conservatives are attempting to paint Black Lives Matter as a war on cops, when we really have a war on Black youth. This is why I love the fact more and more Black Americans are starting not to care about what society thinks Black people should do when it comes to race. We are building strong coalitions to defeat systemic racism, while trying to fortify our own communities; of course Fox news and others would paint a different picture. They live in a bubble, which is why I don’t waste my time with people living in those bubbles any further; do you want the truth? Pop that bubble you are living in and enter the real world. Do research about the past and current plight of Black Americans, then we can talk. Outside of my community, I wouldn’t waste an ounce of my knowledge on someone who can’t take the time to do research on this important issue.

TYT Commentators: Women in the Military

tyt

Onesimus: Smallpox Inoculation

smallpox

Thanks to the pioneering work of Onesimus, many lives were saved from the smallpox epidemic.

Onesimus (fl. 1706 – 1717), slave and medical pioneer, was born in the late seventeenth century, probably in West Africa, although the precise date and place of his birth are unknown. He first appears in the historical record in the diary of Cotton Mather, a prominent New England theologian and minister of Boston’s Old North Church. Reverend Mather notes in a diary entry for 13 December 1706 that members of his congregation purchased for him “a very likely Slave; a young Man who is a Negro of a promising aspect of temper” (Mather, vol. 1, 579). Mather named him Onesimus, after a biblical slave who escaped from his master, an early Christian named Philemon.

http://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/onesimus-fl-1706-1717-slave-and-medical-pioneer-was-born

The idea behind this radical new treatment came from Africa, specifically from a slave named Onesimus, who shared his knowledge with Cotton Mather, the town’s leading minister and his legal owner. Boston still suffered dreadfully, but thanks to Onesimus and Mather, the terror linked to smallpox began to recede after Africans rolled up their sleeves—literally—to show Boston how inoculation worked.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/ideas/2014/10/17/how-african-slave-helped-boston-fight-smallpox/XFhsMMvTGCeV62YP0XhhZI/story.html

http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/broughttolife/people/onesimus

http://www.jstor.org/stable/3491675?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

http://www.blackhistorypages.net/pages/onesimus.php

UCLA Medical Center and UC Regents: Dr. Christian Head

Roland Martin Shuts Down Bill O’Reilly

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Brandon Brooks Has More Sense than the Adults and Officer in that Neighborhood

There were a lot of moronic adults stating that the officer who physically assaulted a 14 year girl and was randomly arresting Black teens at the pool party was justified. Many of them believed more cops were needed for 7 people who supposedly was trespassing, a brief altercation between a mother/daughter and loud music during the day. You also had two White men seemingly protecting the police officer who assaulted the 14 year old girl, from the dangerous non-threatening Black teens from a Middle Class neighborhood. Although Middle class for Black Americans doesn’t provide the same security. 15 year old Brandon Brooks put the officer and the rest of the community to shame with his account.

This isn’t new; White society has always made simple acts from Black individuals or a group seem threatening, as police are called for frivolous actions like walking in the cold with ones hands in his/her pockets. It is ironic that White society has created this image of the pathology of violence by Black Americans, when systemically they are the ones committing it. Yes, I use the word ‘They’, though many Whites aren’t racist, many still support the actions of institutions that are, and many hold racial biases knowingly or unknowingly.

Stating the facts of this reality doesn’t mean Black Americans are off the hook as well, since many allow themselves to perpetuate these falsehood against their own ethnic group. Which is why you see some making excuses for White societies inaction or self internalizes negative beliefs against people who look like them.

And let us not forget…………..

Black Splash Exhibit 


Of the many obstacles that Black swimming culture still faces, perhaps the most daunting, is the very notion that it does not exist: that a Black person enjoying the water is anomalous. Because, in fact, it has existed all along. Photo: Courtesy 12 Miles North

In the great and varied canon of American racial stereotypes, there is a highly detailed list of segregated sports.

Basketball, for instance, is a “Black” sport. Hockey, on the other hand, is for Whites. Surfing falls firmly into the category of “white sport,” somewhere between mountaineering and golf. It could be argued that there is no “whiter” sport in the world that was originally invented by non-whites. There are many ways to illustrate this, but let’s leave it here: It is the only sport since the 1936 summer Olympics in which the 2009 world champion, Mick Fanning, can say something overtly anti-Semitic to a reporter and the outlet that reports the statement will be blamed for bad taste.

 Read more:

http://www.theinertia.com/surf/debunking-the-stereotype-that-…

At their first encounter with sub-Sahara Africans in the 1400’s, Europeans explorers found a culturally aquatic people who learned to swim in the coastal and river villages of west Africa, both men and women, as soon as they could walk. For centuries, Africans were regarded as the world’s greatest swimmers and enslaved African swimmers and divers created enormous wealth for their masters by harvesting pearls, recovering sunken treasures a working in and around the water. Nineteenth and Twentieth Century racism excised this rich aquatic legacy from Black Culture with these tragic consequences. Today, as many as 80% of African Americans are not competent and comfortable swimmers, and African Americans are 3 to 4 times more likely to drown than whites. Celebrate Black History Month with the International Swimming Hall of Fame by learning about the rich history and inspirational stories of Black Swimmers of the past, present and future.

 Read more:

http://www.ishof.org/black_history/

HISTORY

The Blind African Slave or Memoirs of Boyrereau Brinch, Nicknamed Jeffrey Brace, As Told to Benjamin F. Prentiss, Esq.

2004, Edited and with an introduction by Kari J. Winter. University of Wisconsin Press

In 1810 in St. Albans, Vermont, a small town near the Canadian border, a narrative of slavery was published by an obscure printer. Entitled The Blind African Slave or Memoirs of Boyrereau Brinch, Nicknamed Jeffrey Brace, it was greeted with no fanfare, and it has remained for nearly two hundred years a faint spectre in our cultural memory.

Read more:

http://www.ishof.org/black_history/history.htm

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