Africans and The Making of the Americas: Part 3, Herding

Residents of the vast savanna region of West Africa; notably the Mandinka, Wolof, Fulani, Hausa, and Nupe began raising cattle at least as early as 4000 B.C. Those who came to the essential because Europeans had no experience with the conditions presented by the Americas, where there was abundant land and small labor force. Africans, on the other hand, were adept at managing large numbers of herders. (The Fulani in particular have long been legendary for their ability to identify every member of a large herd and to know immediately whether an animal is missing.) Not surprisingly, Africans were in great demand in all areas of the Americas where ranching was major activity, and they introduced the patterns of the open grazing now practiced throughout the Americas. Both the harvesting of cattle drive were adapted from African practices. In addition, Africans were the first to use artificial insemination in cattle breeding and to use cow’s milk for human consumption.

Africans had tended cattle as slaves in the South, and slave owners brought them to Texas from other Southern states. In 1845, Texas had an estimated 100,000 Whites and 35,000 slaves. By 1861, the state had 430,000 Whites and 182,000 slaves. After the Civil War, African Americans played a major though seldom acknowledged role in the American expansion in the West. They were cowhands, gunslingers, cowboys and much more; men like Nat Love, Bill Pickett, One Horse Charley, Bronco Sam, George Glenn and Bose Ikard. In addition to a number of Western terms have been traced back to African origins. Bronco which means “rough” or “crude” in contemporary Spanish, derives from an African-language, term and was first used to denote African cattle handle.

Sources

http://sincereignorance.com/2014/08/06/black-americans-american-west-cowboys-towns-2/

http://sincereignorance.com/2014/08/06/black-americans-american-west-cowboys-towns/

Gumbo Origin and Words of African Origin

Gumbo: Derived from various Bantu dialects (Southern & Central Africa) terms for okra (i.e. quingumbo, grugombo, gumbo, gombo, ngombo gomboaud, ngumbo, ochinggombo).

Gumbo is often cited as an example of the melting-pot nature of Louisiana cooking, but trying to sort out the origins and evolution of the dish is highly speculative. The name derives from a West African word for okra, suggesting that gumbo was originally made with okra. The use of filé (dried and ground sassafras leaves) was a contribution of the Choctaws and, possibly, other local tribes. Roux has its origin in French cuisine, although the roux used in gumbos is much darker than its Gallic cousins.

One of the things I love about the U.S is its’ cultural diversity/expressiveness, though we don’t celebrate it properly all of the time.

Words of Africa Origin

The books are Newbell Niles Puckett’s Black Names in America: Origins and Usage, which was published in 1975; Winifred Kellersberger Vass’ The Bantu Speaking Heritage of the United States published in 1979; Gerard Matthew Dalgish’s A Dictionary of Africanisms: Contributions of Sub-Saharan Africa to the English Language published in 1982; Joseph E. Holloway’s Africanisms in American Culture published in 1990; and Joseph E Holloway’s and Winifred Kellersberger Vass’ The African Heritage of American English published in 1993.

A distinct feature of the English language is its extensive borrowing from other languages. According to some

sources, only about 30 percent of the vocabulary we use in modern English is derived from the native tongue itself, that is, from Anglo-Saxon—English prior to about 1100. The rest is derived from an amalgam of different languages, leading some to call the English language a “loaned language.”

https://www.southernfoodways.org/oral-history/southern-gumbo-trail/

http://allafrica.com/stories/201307291505.html

http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary151.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of_African_origin

http://www.taneter.org/moors.html

http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-jaz1.htm

http://www.foodreference.com/html/artgumbo.html

https://www.southernfoodways.org/interview/a-short-history-of-gumbo/

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/neworleans/sfeature/food.html

Black Americans: American West, Cowboys, & Towns Part 1

Part 1: Cowboys/American West.



The Legend of the Black Cowboy
and His Music


http://www.npr.org/2010/12/05/131761541/we-ve-all-heard-cowbo…

Various aspects of the Spanish
equestrian tradition can be traced back to Islamic rule in Spain, including
Moorish elements






http://www.npr.org/2010/12/05/131761541/we-ve-all-heard-cowbo…

http://www.npr.org/player/v2/mediaPlayer.html?action=1&t;=1&i…

Trying to keep the tradition
alive texas

 

The forgotten man of the west

“Bill Pickett, the second of 13 children, began his career as a cowboy while in grade school. Pickett soon began giving exhibitions of his roping, riding, and bulldogging skills, passing a hat for donations. By 1888, his family had moved to Taylor, Texas, and Bill performed in the town’s first fair that year. He and his brothers started a horse-breaking business in Taylor, and he was a member of the National Guard and a deacon of the Baptist church.”

Read more: http://www.aaregistry.org/?q=historic_events/view/bill-pickett-was-cowboy-legend

 

http://www.billpickettrodeo.com/

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